The Average Cost of a Sauna: A Guide for Homeowners

Are you looking for an addition to your home that provides a slew of health benefits?

We’re talking about an extra room that allows you to relax, improves your cardiovascular health, provides pain relief, and reduces your stress levels. 

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No, we’re not talking about spending tens of thousands of dollars on a new bedroom. We’re talking about buying a sauna.

Saunas are the perfect way to make your home more like a spa. They’re the new hot tub. They’re a fantastic idea!

But what is the cost of a sauna? Do the advantages outweigh the price tag? Is a new sauna the right purchase for you?

Keep reading for the major factors that influence sauna prices.

What Is the Typical Cost of a Sauna?

Here’s the thing: there is no average cost of a sauna.

Like anything you buy, saunas vary greatly in price depending on size, brand name, type, and more. You might be buying a mobile sauna for personal use or an industrial one for a whole family. Because of the many styles, you can expect to pay  many different prices, too.

Here’s what influences price.

Size of the Sauna

D’you know how filet mignons are some of the smallest steaks with the highest price tags?

Well, saunas are usually the opposite of that. The bigger your room, the bigger the check you’ll have to write.

Most saunas are designed to fit at least four people. However, for a cheaper price tag, you can consider a smaller, portable option and pay a few hundred bucks. Similarly, you can upgrade to a larger sauna—but expect to pay in the thousands for it.

Type of Sauna

While all saunas provide similar benefits (this article outlines a few), they do come in a variety of styles.

Saunas can be:

  • Wood-burning
  • Electric
  • Infrared

What’s the difference? 

Wood-burning saunas offer low humidity with that desired high temperature. Electrically-heated saunas have high temps and low humidity, too, but are heated by an in-room electrical heater. Infrared rooms, also known as FIRS, require the use of special lamps that heat a person’s body through light waves—not the actual room.

Wood-burning and electrically-heated saunas typically have similar installation prices, but wood-burning saunas are more affordable on average. 

Sauna Brand Name

If you’re looking for a great home sauna, you can typically find some within the $500.00-$2,000.00 range. 

However, medically-produced saunas can range higher, costing several thousand dollars apiece. 

Can You Handle the Heat (And the Price Tag)? If So, Buy a Sauna!

While there is no standard cost of a sauna, the factors that influence its price can help you determine your budget.

First, consider your needs. Then, factor in your wants. Finally, find the sauna that best meets those while also remaining affordable for your situation. 

Use this guide to buy something that’s budget-friendly and offers you all the benefits you hope to reap.

For more tips on all things home- and finance-related, keep scrolling our page. We can help you improve your living space while staying in the green. See you there!

 

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